Was McDonald's Wage Increase a Publicity Stunt?

McDonaldsMinWage.jpg

McDonald's recently announced a wage increase for thousands of its low-wage employees, but the increase is being called a publicity stunt since it won't effect all of the fast-food chain's workers.

With most of McDonald's being franchise-owned, the raise only "applies to U.S. locations that are owned and operated by McDonald’s itself," according to Time.com. Therefore only "12% of the 750,000 workers" will receive a raise. 

McDonald’s new CEO, Steve Easterbrook, who made the announcement on Wednesday, called the raise an “initial step” in raising the minimum wage. The worker's hourly wage effected by the increase will rise a $1 above the local minimum wage—an average pay of $10 per hour by the end of 2016.

But the "spotlight" is now on the franchise owners to see if they follow McDonald's corporate lead, according to Time. Since franchised restaurants are independent of McDonald's, they make their own hiring choices and set their own wages.

Many advocacy groups are calling the pay increase a publicity stunt vowing that the movement won’t stop until they get what they deserve. Leaders of the “Fight for $15″ movement set April 15 as the date for a nationwide strike to push for a living wage for all low-wage workers.

What's next for McDonald's workers?


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